Program crossover in resolume

Playing with multiple programs at once can cause the exact opposite of brain freeze- to me it actually feels like my cerebellum is melting. 

Its actually pretty common to use multiple different kind of programs to achieve different effects. There is no one program (to my knowledge) that facilitates a full range of features for content creation AND editing. After effects comes close, but the 3D capabilities are incredibly limited. Also, experimenting with effects and editing tends to require more conscious effort and deliberation, whereas I really like to experiment and let the software surprise me when it comes to editing. Creating a range of content in after effects, cinema4D, photoshop, and processing allows me to explore the variance of my visual sensibilities, but experimenting with resolume has really opened my eyes to the sensory powers of editing. 

Just as you can create compositions or scenes in other programs, in resolume you can create a deck. This allows for three rows of media clips, all of which can be laid overtop of each other. They can be edited individually within the effects panel, and the style in which they are overlaid can also be changed. There are a variety of different blending modes available which will look familiar to any photoshop user, but also different video layering effects, such as tile and timeswitcher. 

 Options to edit each individual clip as well as the composition as a whole are present underneath the deck (featured at the top). Theres also an effects library to the far bottom right, which can be applied in the clip editor window. here you can edit the size, speed, rotation, and opacity of your clip, as well as the parameters of the applied effects. 

Options to edit each individual clip as well as the composition as a whole are present underneath the deck (featured at the top). Theres also an effects library to the far bottom right, which can be applied in the clip editor window. here you can edit the size, speed, rotation, and opacity of your clip, as well as the parameters of the applied effects. 

I started getting into this in December/January after I had done the visuals for two shows in DC and also made a music video- thus I had a lot of new content and was curious about different ways to reconstruct it. 

Integrating the products of many different programs into one interface is my own form of compositing. Especially when music is introduced, its a way to tell stories and play with tone. Obviously upbeat techno is going to tell a different story than downtempo electronic R&B.

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These four works all came from different musical genres, and many of the elements featured are pulled from different content creation platforms and media sources. 

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Each piece, although abstract and seemingly nonsensical, all begin to tell their own stories- particularly about the clash of tradition with technology, and of consciousness with consumerism. The tools provided by Resolume allow you to layer and organize your clips accordingly, whether you are trying to construct a clear narrative or just play around with visual patterns. 

As time goes by I want to start adding more figurative elements to these somewhat abstract visual elements. I also think it would be interesting to create 3D environments, pushing through them with interesting camera angles, and then importing those into resolume, and layering objects and even character elements within them. 

Resolume is a tool used by many, for many styles and many purposes. If youve been to a concert or an installation that featured video projections, theres a chance that the visual content mixing was done using resolume. Its a tool thats relatively simple to pick up at a base level, with high capabilities for complex adaptation. I can't wait to see where it goes and also how its integrated with projection mapping software madMapper!